Grant McWilliams

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17 items tagged "Cloud"

  • Apply hotfixes to XCP 1.6

    Xenserver hotfixes are released as patches that need to be applied with patch-pool-apply. Although technically this could work with XCP as long as you got the correct Xenserver patch it's better to apply patches the "new" way using Yum and the default xcp repository.

    Any minor software updates to Xen Cloud Platform will be released into the XCP Yum repository at downloads.xen.org.  XCP 1.6 comes with a ready made Yum repository file at /etc/yum.repos.d/xcp.repo although by default the repository is disabled.

    To apply updates use the yum update command you have to enable the repo and tell rpm not  to gpg check the packages. Hopefully the latter behavior will change in the future.

    yum --enablerepo xcp --nogpgcheck update

    If you'd like to enable the repo and turn gpg checking off by default so future updates are easier then change the enabled=0 line to enabled=1. Also add a line to the /etc/yum.repos.d/xcp.repo file to turn gpgchecking off for this ONE repository.

     

    [xcp]
    name=XCP 1.6 Updates
    baseurl=http://downloads.xen.org/XCP/repo/xcp-1.6.10/
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=0
    

    I don't know if I recommend enabling by default as I like to do my updates manually. I really have issues with turning gpg checking off but currently the packages are distributed without a gpg signature so if you have it turned on the update will fail. Our only choice is to turn it off.

  • Automated install of CentOS 6 VM (32 bit)

    Note: Updated for XCP 1.5b/1.6

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 virtual machine (32 bit) installation on Xen howtowhich was based on the CentOS 5 version of the same. In those tutorials I created a disk, downloaded a kernel, kickstart file plus a xen config file which installed CentOS using the kickstart file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a CentOS mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

    I've recently migrated a lot of my XEN systems to Xen Cloud Platform and it's a very different animal indeed. However, I still needed a system of creating CentOS Virtual Machines in that same manner. I didn't want to download a CentOS install DVD or need a graphical login to install the OS thus this tutorial was born.

    It uses the very same CentOS 6 kickstart file from my site as the Xen tutorial. It also uses the very same CentOS 6 repositories on the Internet so in a lot aspects it IS the same tutorial crafted for XCP but will be a bit shorter.

     More after the jump.

  • Automated install of CentOS 6 VM (64 bit)

    Note: updated for XCP 1.5b/1.6 and Xenserver 6.x.

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 virtual machine (64 bit) installation on Xen. In those tutorials I created a disk, downloaded a kernel, kickstart file plus a xen config file which installed CentOS using the kickstart file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a CentOS mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

     

  • Automated install of CentOS 7 VM (64 bit)

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 virtual machine (64 bit) installation on Xen howto. In that tutorial I created a disk, downloaded a kernel, kickstart file plus a xen config file which installed CentOS using the kickstart file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a CentOS mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

    I now use Xenserver and it's a very different animal indeed. However, I still needed a system of creating CentOS Virtual Machines in that same manner. I didn't want to download a CentOS install DVD or need a graphical login to install the OS thus this tutorial was born.

    Warning! This tutorial is for CentOS version 7 on Xenserver 6.5. To use Xenserver 6.2 or later you will need to shoehorn grub-legacy into it.I've managed to get CentOS7 to run in Xenserver 6.2 but I had to do the following. 

    1. Install CentOS7 in Xenserver 6.5 
    2. Boot the VM and login
    3. Uninstall grub2
    4. Manually download grub-legacy and install
    5. Download grub.conf file to /boot/grub/grub.conf (edit if necessary)
    6. Run the grub command to install it
      1. # grub
      2. grub> device (hd0) /dev/xvda
      3. grub> root (hd0,0)
      4. grub> setup (hd0)
      5. grub> quit
    7. Place exclude=grub* in your /etc/yum.conf
    8. Shut down the VM and export it using vm-export
    9. Copy the VM to the Xenserver 6.2 host and vm-import

     

  • Automated install of Debian Wheezy VM (64 bit) using preseed

    Note: This is not totally automated yet. I need to fix several things.

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution
     

    Introduction

    In this tutorial I create a disk, download a kernel, preseed file and install Debian Wheezy using the preseed file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a Ubuntu mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

     

     Note: This tutorial is designed so you can copy and paste the text inside the boxes. I don't actually type any of this in and neither should you.

     

    1. Getting the network info

    This line gets the Network UUID for xenbr0. If you're using a different bridge you will want to insert it here. Get a list of XCP networks with xe network-list. This network is connected to the outside interface. This tutorial requires there to be a DHCP server on this network answering requests and providing network access to the Internet.

    NETUUID=$(xe network-list bridge=xenbr0 --minimal)

    2. Creating the VM and setting parameters

    Here we create a new template from the Debian Squeeze template. Then we create the VM from the new Debian template, create a network interface and add it to our network from step one. Additional settings are for configuring the install repository and specifying thepreseed file from my site. The last setting turns off VNC so we can watch the install via a text console (very important in my environment).  Even if you can't see all the text below just highlight and paste. The text is there even if it's not visible.

     

    TMPLUUID=$(xe template-list | grep -B1 'name-label.*Debian.*Squeeze.*64-bit' | awk -F: '/uuid/{print $2}'| tr -d " ")
    VMUUID=$(xe vm-install new-name-label="Debian Wheezy" template=${TMPLUUID}) 
    xe vif-create vm-uuid=${VMUUID} network-uuid=${NETUUID} mac=random device=0
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config-install-repository=http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:debian-release=wheezy
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:install-methods=http,cdrom,ftp,nfs
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} PV-args="netcfg/get_hostname=Wheezy debian-installer/locale=en_US console-keymaps-at/keymap=us console-setup/layoutcode=us console-setup/ask_detect=false interface=eth0 netcfg/disable_dhcp=false preseed/url=http://grantmcwilliams.com/files/preseed-debian-wheezy.cfg console=hvc0"
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:disable_pv_vnc=1
    
    

    3. Starting the VM and watching the install

    The VM installs without any interaction from the user at this point. It is however, nice to watch it using xenconsole. Once it's done installing it will shutdown.

    If you're using XCP 1.0/1.1

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    DOMID=$(xe vm-list uuid=${VMUUID} params=dom-id --minimal)
    /usr/lib/xen/bin/xenconsole ${DOMID}

    If you're using XCP 1.5b/1.6

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID ; xe console uuid=$VMUUID

    4. Starting the VM and configuring settings

    We need to boot the VM up again and using xenconsole log in to reset the finish configuration.

    If you're using XCP 1.0/1.1

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    DOMID=$(xe vm-list uuid=${VMUUID} params=dom-id --minimal)
    /usr/lib/xen/bin/xenconsole ${DOMID}

    If you're using XCP 1.5b/1.6

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    xe console uuid=$VMUUID

    Now that your Debian Wheezy VM is running you can login. The password was automatically set by the preseed file.

    • Username:debian
    • Password: password

    Reset the ubuntu users password.  If you want to keep the IP assignment dynamic note the ip address.

    5. Shutting down the VM and re-enabling VNC

    If you're going to use XVP or some other method of connecting to the VMs direct VNC connection you'll need to enable it.

    xe vm-shutdown uuid=$VMUUID
    xe vm-param-remove uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:disable_pv_vnc
    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID

    7. Export our VM for safe keeping

    Before you start modifying the base Debian Wheezy image you should back it up.

    xe vm-export uuid=$VMUUID filename=DebianWheezy-base.xva

    Be aware that you may not have enough space on the Control Domain's disk to export it. A good solution (and shorter than explaining how to add disks to the control domain) is to mount an nfs volume and export it there.

    mount nfsserver:/share /media/share
    xe vm-export uuid=$VMUUID filename=/media/share/DebianWheezy-base.xva

    This would mount the NFS share on nfsserver to /media/share. The exported disk would be saved on the NFS share.

     

  • Automated install of Fedora 20 VM (32 bit)

    Note: updated for XCP 1.5b/1.6 and Xenserver 6.x

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was originally written for CentOS and has been adapted for Fedora 20. 


     Note: This tutorial is designed so you can copy and paste the text inside the boxes. I don't actually type any of this in and neither should you.

     

    1. Getting the network info

    This line gets the Network UUID for xenbr0. If you're using a different bridge you will want to insert it here. Get a list of XCP networks with xe network-list. This network is connected to the outside interface. This tutorial requires there to be a DHCP server on this network answering requests and providing network access to the Internet.

    NETUUID=$(xe network-list bridge=xenbr0 --minimal)

    2. Creating the VM and setting parameters

    Here we create the VM from the RHEL6 template, create a network interface and add it to our network from step one. Additional settings are for configuring the install repository and specifying the kickstart file from my site. The last setting turns off VNC so we can watch the install via a text console (very important in my environment).  Even if you can't see all the text below just highlight and paste. The text is there even if it's not visible.

    TMPLUUID=$(xe template-list | grep -B1 'name-label.*Red Hat.* 6.*32-bit' | awk -F: '/uuid/{print $2}'| tr -d " ")
    VMUUID=$(xe vm-install new-name-label="Fedora20" template=${TMPLUUID})
    xe vif-create vm-uuid=$VMUUID network-uuid=$NETUUID mac=random device=0
    xe vm-param-set uuid=$VMUUID other-config:install-repository=http://mirror.symnds.com/distributions/fedora/releases/20/Fedora/i386/os/
    xe vm-param-set uuid=$VMUUID PV-args="ks=http://grantmcwilliams.com/files/kickstart-minimal-fedora20-i386.cfg ksdevice=eth0"
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:disable_pv_vnc=1

    3. Starting the VM and watching the install

    The VM installs without any interaction from the user at this point. It is however, nice to watch it using xenconsole. Once it's done installing it will shutdown.

    If you're using XCP 1.0/1.1

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    DOMID=$(xe vm-list uuid=${VMUUID} params=dom-id --minimal)
    /usr/lib/xen/bin/xenconsole ${DOMID}

     

    If you're using XCP 1.5b/1.6 or Xenserver 6.x

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    xe console uuid=$VMUUID

     

    4. Starting the VM and configuring settings

    We need to boot the VM up again and using xenconsole log in as root to configure the network and reset the root users password.

    If you're using XCP 1.0/1.1

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    DOMID=$(xe vm-list uuid=${VMUUID} params=dom-id --minimal)
    /usr/lib/xen/bin/xenconsole ${DOMID}

    If you're using XCP 1.5b/1.6 or Xenserver 6.x

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    xe console uuid=$VMUUID

    Now that yourFedora VM is running you can login. The password was automatically set by the kickstart file.

    • Username: root
    • Password: password

    Reset the root users password and change the network settings to static IP using system-config-network. If you want to keep the IP assignment dynamic note the ip address.

    5. Shutting down the VM and re-enabling VNC

    If you're going to use XVP or some other method of connecting to the VMs direct VNC connection you'll need to enable it.

    xe vm-shutdown uuid=$VMUUID
    xe vm-param-remove uuid=${VMUUID} param-name=other-config param-key=disable_pv_vnc
    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID

     

    6. Add RPMfusion repository

    I almost always install RPMfusion. It is very stable and doesn't replace standard packages.

    yum localinstall --nogpgcheck http://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-stable.noarch.rpm

     

    7. Export our VM for safe keeping

    Before you start modifying the base Fedora image you should back it up.

    xe vm-export uuid=$VMUUID filename=Fedora20-base.xva

      

    Be aware that you may not have enough space on the Control Domain's disk to export it. A good solution (and shorter than explaining how to add disks to the control domain) is to mount an nfs volume and export it there.

    mount nfsserver:/share /media/share
    xe vm-export uuid=$VMUUID filename=/media/share/Fedora20-base.xva

     

    This would mount the NFS share on nfsserver to /media/share. The exported disk would be saved on the NFS share.

     

    Notes: Since it's more likely that you will want to do a Fedora desktop install than for the other Operating Systems I've written tutorials for I've put together a list of packages for your custom kickstart file (extracted from the Fedora-20-comps.xml file.)

     

    • admin-tools
    • authoring-and-publishing
    • base
    • base-x
    • books
    • cloud-infrastructure
    • clustering
    • design-suite
    • development-libs
    • development-tools
    • dial-up
    • directory-server
    • dns-server
    • dogtag
    • eclipse
    • editors
    • education
    • electronic-lab
    • engineering-and-scientific
    • fedora-packager
    • font-design
    • fonts
    • ftp-server
    • games
    • gnome-desktop
    • gnome-software-development
    • graphical-internet
    • graphics
    • haskell
    • input-methods
    • java
    • java-development
    • kde-desktop
    • kde-software-development
    • legacy-fonts
    • legacy-network-server
    • legacy-software-development
    • libreoffice-development
    • lxde-desktop
    • mail-server
    • medical
    • meego-netbook
    • milkymist
    • mingw32
    • mysql
    • network-server
    • news-server
    • ocaml
    • office
    • perl
    • printing
    • robotics-suite
    • ruby
    • server-cfg
    • smb-server
    • sound-and-video
    • sql-server
    • sugar-desktop
    • system-tools
    • text-internet
    • virtualization
    • virtualization-hypervisor
    • web-development
    • web-server
    • window-managers
    • xfce-desktop
    • xfce-software-development
    • x-software-development

     

    To insert any of these package groups into your own custom kickstart file precede the group name with an @ and insert it in the Package section.

    # Packages
    %packages --excludedocs
    @ base
    man
    man-pages
    sendmail
    yum-presto
    %end

    Then to use your kickstart file save it to a webserver somewhere. Follow the installation instructions but refer to your kickstart file (ks=<URL> in Step 2. 

    xe vm-param-set uuid=$VMUUID PV-args="ks=http://grantmcwilliams.com/files/kickstart-minimal-fedora20-i386.cfg ksdevice=eth0"

     

  • Automated install of Fedora 20 VM (32 bit)

    Note: updated for XCP 1.5b/1.6 and Xenserver 6.x

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was originally written for CentOS and has been adapted for Fedora 20. 

  • Automated install of Fedora 20 VM (64 bit)

    Note: updated for XCP 1.5b/1.6 and Xenserver 6.x

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was originally written for CentOS and has been adapted for Fedora 20 x86_64. 

  • Automated install of Kali Linux VM (64 bit) using preseed

    Note: This has not really been tested yet. I wanted to get it up here so people can start using it and I can work on it.

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution
     

    Introduction

    In this tutorial I create a disk, download a kernel, preseed file and install Kali LInux using the preseed file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a Ubuntu mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

     

     Note: This tutorial is designed so you can copy and paste the text inside the boxes. I don't actually type any of this in and neither should you.

     

    1. Getting the network info

    This line gets the Network UUID for xenbr0. If you're using a different bridge you will want to insert it here. Get a list of XCP networks with xe network-list. This network is connected to the outside interface. This tutorial requires there to be a DHCP server on this network answering requests and providing network access to the Internet.

    NETUUID=$(xe network-list bridge=xenbr0 --minimal)
    

     

    2. Creating the VM and setting parameters

    Here we create a new template from the Debian Squeeze template. Then we create the VM from the new Debian template, create a network interface and add it to our network from step one. Additional settings are for configuring the install repository and specifying thepreseed file from my site. The last setting turns off VNC so we can watch the install via a text console (very important in my environment).  Even if you can't see all the text below just highlight and paste. The text is there even if it's not visible.

     

    TMPLUUID=$(xe template-list | grep -B1 'name-label.*Debian.*Squeeze.*64-bit' | awk -F: '/uuid/{print $2}'| tr -d " ")
    VMUUID=$(xe vm-install new-name-label="Kali Linux" template=${TMPLUUID}) 
    xe vif-create vm-uuid=${VMUUID} network-uuid=${NETUUID} mac=random device=0
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config-install-repository=http://http.kali.org
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:debian-release=kali
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:install-methods=http,cdrom,ftp,nfs
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} PV-args="netcfg/get_hostname=Kali debian-installer/locale=en_US console-keymaps-at/keymap=us console-setup/layoutcode=us console-setup/ask_detect=false interface=eth0 netcfg/disable_dhcp=false preseed/url=http://grantmcwilliams.com/files/preseed-kali-linux.cfg console=hvc0"
    xe vm-param-set uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:disable_pv_vnc=1

     

    3. Starting the VM and watching the install

    The VM installs without any interaction from the user at this point. It is however, nice to watch it using xenconsole. Once it's done installing it will shutdown.

    If you're using XCP 1.0/1.1

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    DOMID=$(xe vm-list uuid=${VMUUID} params=dom-id --minimal)
    /usr/lib/xen/bin/xenconsole ${DOMID

    If you're using XCP 1.5b/1.6

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID ; xe console uuid=$VMUUID

    4. Starting the VM and configuring settings

    We need to boot the VM up again and using xenconsole log in to reset the finish configuration.

    If you're using XCP 1.0/1.1

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    DOMID=$(xe vm-list uuid=${VMUUID} params=dom-id --minimal)
    /usr/lib/xen/bin/xenconsole ${DOMID}

     

    If you're using XCP 1.5b/1.6

    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID
    xe console uuid=$VMUUID

     

    Now that your Kali Linux VM is running you can login. The password was automatically set by the preseed file.

    • Username:root
    • Password: password

    Reset the root users password.  If you want to keep the IP assignment dynamic note the ip address.

    5. Shutting down the VM and re-enabling VNC

    If you're going to use XVP or some other method of connecting to the VMs direct VNC connection you'll need to enable it.

    xe vm-shutdown uuid=$VMUUID
    xe vm-param-remove uuid=${VMUUID} other-config:disable_pv_vnc
    xe vm-start uuid=$VMUUID

     

    7. Export our VM for safe keeping

    Before you start modifying the base Kali Linux image you should back it up.

    xe vm-export uuid=$VMUUID filename=Kali-Linux-base.xva

     

     

    Be aware that you may not have enough space on the Control Domain's disk to export it. A good solution (and shorter than explaining how to add disks to the control domain) is to mount an nfs volume and export it there.

    mount nfsserver:/share /media/share
    xe vm-export uuid=$VMUUID filename=/media/share/Kali-Linux-base.xva

     

    This would mount the NFS share on nfsserver to /media/share. The exported disk would be saved on the NFS share.

     

  • Automated install of Ubuntu 12.04 VM (32 bit) using preseed

    Note: Updated to work with XCP 1.5b/1.6

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution
     

    Introduction

    In this tutorial I create a disk, download a kernel, preseed file and install Ubuntu using the preseed file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a Ubuntu mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

     

  • Automated install of Ubuntu 12.04 VM (64 bit) using kickstart

    Note: This is not quite functional. Ubuntu is asking a few questions during the install and then ultimately failing. I would recommend using my other Ubuntu 12.04 tutorial using a preseed file to auto install.

    Note: Updated to work with XCP 1.5b/1.6

    Thanks goes out to Alastair Brunton for troubleshooting this tutorial for me.

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution
     

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 VM (64 bit) automated installation on XCP howto. In this tutorial I create a disk, download a kernel, kickstart file and install Ubuntu using the kickstart file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a Ubuntu mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

    This tutorial isn't "debian pure" since I chose to use a kickstart file instead of a preseed file. I've created preseed files for doing automated installations of Ubuntu before but in this case I wanted this tutorial to be as close to the CentOS one as possible making it easier for me to maintain thus the kickstart file.

     

  • Automated install of Ubuntu 12.04 VM (64 bit) using preseed

    Note: Updated to work with XCP 1.5b/1.6

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution
     

    Introduction

    In this tutorial I create a disk, download a kernel, preseed file and install Ubuntu using the preseed file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing an Ubuntu mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

     

  • Behold Frankencloud!

    [sigplus] Critical error: Image gallery folder galleries/frankencloud is expected to be a path relative to the image base folder specified in the back-end.

    I've been wanting to revive some equipment from the garage. I have some old dual Xeon machines that I picked up from a contract a while back. I also bought some "Designed for Google" dual CPU Xeon boards that I haven't used for anything. I've been using one of these boards in a server that's been running non-stop for probably 6 years and it's always been rock solid. Now that I'm documenting Xen Cloud Platform as part of the Xenapi Admin Project I wanted to put together a multi-host cloud using Xen Cloud Platform and it's best if your hosts match thus the renewed interest in getting this machine up and going.

    However, there's been a few problems. 

    1. The CPUs from the Google boards don't work in the ASUS boards due to different FSB
    2. I only had three CPUs for four sockets
    3. I was missing a heat sink too
    4. They use DDR2 ECC Registered ram which isn't common
    5. Intel should have their teeth kicked in for designing three (count them) different heat sink/fan designs for one socket.
    6. I needed backplates for two CPUs, the ones that arrived had no spring clips
    7. My replacement heatsink came with one spring clip
    8. Only one retailer had spring clips

    So I started by ordering a new copper heatsink because at the time I thought I could use the CPUs out of the Google boards.  The heatsink arrived with one spring clip, I needed two. After I realized that I couldn't use the CPUs from the Google boards I then ordered a new CPU.  Armed with a new CPU and heatsink I installed them only to find out that I needed a spring clip to keep the heat sink ON the CPU. Only one retailer even carried it so I ordered one.  Now if only I had a power supply strong enough to run the board. Back to the garage again. 

    In the garage I found a brand new computer case which surprisingly also had a brand new Pentium D motherboard in it. More booty from contracts. I wasn't concerned with the Pentium D but it had a Sparkle Power 600 watt power supply... Score!! 

    As of today I now have a dual Xeon server in a 4u case to match it's duplicate. I need to score some ddr2 ecc registered ram as it only has 2 GB in it. That crap is expensive so I went to Ebay and I have bids on a couple batches of 8GB. We'll see if I get them.

    The board was too big for the case too. I had to get out the hacksaw and cut away at the drive cage so it would fit. and drill new holes in the side of the case to mount a fan for more direct airflow.

     

    This board is a little interesting.  It has...

    1. Two Ultra-SCSI 320 channels
    2. A zero channel raid slot
    3. 64 bit, 133 mhz PCI-X slots
    4. 8x PCI Express slot
    5. 133 MB/sec IDE
    6. SATA2
    7. 8 Dimm slots
    8. 2 CPU sockets

    The Xeons don't have VT in them so I'll only be able to paravirtualize but that's all I ever do anyway. However Xeon 7030s have VT and will fit the board if anyone has any they want to get rid of cheap.

     

    {gallery labels=filename}galleries/frankencloud{/gallery}  

     

     

  • Copy of Automated install of CentOS 7 VM (64 bit)

    Install Type

    • Non-interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 virtual machine (64 bit) installation on Xen howto. In that tutorial I created a disk, downloaded a kernel, kickstart file plus a xen config file which installed CentOS using the kickstart file. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using an install disk. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a CentOS mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

    I now use Xenserver and it's a very different animal indeed. However, I still needed a system of creating CentOS Virtual Machines in that same manner. I didn't want to download a CentOS install DVD or need a graphical login to install the OS thus this tutorial was born.

    This tutorial is for CentOS version 7. 

     

  • Interactive install of OpenSuse 11.4 VM (64 bit)

    Note: Updated to work with XCP 1.5b/1.6

    Install Type

    • Interactive
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Prerequisites

    • XCP/Xenserver
    • Access to Internet
    • Working DHCP server
    • Working DNS name resolution

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 VM (64 bit) automated installation on XCP  howto. In that tutorial I do an automated network installation of CentOS 6. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using a physical install media. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a CentOS mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

    There became a need to do the same thing using OpenSuse thus this tutorial.  

  • OpenSuse 11.4 VM (64 bit) automated installation on XCP

    Install Type

    • Semi-automated
    • Network boot
    • Commandline
    • Paravirtualized

    Introduction

    This tutorial was written in the spirit of my CentOS 6 VM (64 bit) automated installation on XCP  howto. In that tutorial I do an automated network installation of CentOS 6. This has proven very popular since you can't install a paravirtualized domain using a physical install media. This has been a very nice installation howto because you don't have to download any install CD/DVDs and you could create VMs using nothing more than a commandline login. It's also very nice because it can be mirrored locally if you're doing a bunch of them just by rsyncing a CentOS mirror locally then downloading my files and editing them.

    There became a need to do the same thing using OpenSuse thus this tutorial.  

  • Xenserver Howtos

    Xen Cloud Platform is the free/open community driven version of Citrix Xenserver.  I've moved all of my Xen Virtual Machines to Xen cloud Platform so any future tutorials will most likely be about XCP. I've found XCP to be a wonderful product but not necessarily an easy tool sometimes thus the tutorials you see below.

    Citrix Xenserver has been opensourced and thus there's no need for Xen Cloud Platform any longer. Most of the tutorials here work on both but all future tutorials will be targeting Xenserver. As time permits I'm updating tutorials for Xenserver 6.5 (Creedence) - Jan 15, 2014.

    How to get started: Go to xenserver.org and download the latest ISO disk image of Xenserver and install it on a machine. If you don't have a CD drive on your Xenserver host put the installer on a USB drive. It uses the whole machine as it's an appliance so beware. By the way I think this is the best design strategy. It's a good idea to let your Hypervisor/Cloud stack focus on what it's good at and not use it for playing World of Warcraft. ;-)

    Expect a great deal more Howtos in the future. Feel free to request them as well. If it's within scope of what I'm doing I may create one just for you.

     These tutorials can also be found on the Xenapi Admin Project website and the XCP wiki.

     

     

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